Understanding (disrupted) participation in community sports clubs: Situated wellbeing, social practices and affinities and atmospheres

Richard Lee*, Paul Potrac

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Abstract

Participation in sport is viewed as a key means of improving health and wellbeing in many countries, but the processes constituting participation in community sports clubs remain poorly understood. Although studies have considered the wellbeing implications of non-competitive and individual sporting activity, further theoretical and empirical work is required to understand (both sporting and non-sporting) participation in community sports clubs. In this article we consider the contribution of approaches to social practice, situated wellbeing and affinities and atmospheres to advance our understanding. Using the example of community cricket clubs in England and Wales, we consider the potential of such approaches and the implications of disruptions brought about by the COVID-19 (Coronavirus) crisis. In conclusion, we argue that in a period characterised by political, social and economic turmoil, being able to provide detailed, place specific accounts of the important relations and practices existing in and through community sports clubs is a crucial activity for social scientists.
Original languageEnglish
Article number100005
Number of pages5
JournalWellbeing, Space and Society
Volume2
Early online date2 Nov 2020
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2021

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