Using intervention mapping to develop and facilitate implementation of a multifaceted behavioural intervention targeting physical activity and sedentary behaviour in stroke survivors: Physical Activity Routines After Stroke (PARAS): intervention development study

Sarah Moore, Darren Flynn, Christopher I. M. Price, Leah Avery*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: The benefits of increased physical activity for stroke survivors include improved function and mental health and wellbeing. However, less than 30% achieve recommended physical activity levels, and high levels of sedentary behaviour are reported. We developed a multifaceted behavioural intervention (and accompanying implementation plan) targeting physical activity and sedentary behaviour of stroke survivors.
Design: Intervention Mapping facilitated intervention development. Step 1 involved a systematic review, focus group discussions and a review of care pathways. Step 2 identified social cognitive determinants of behavioural change and behavioural outcomes. Step 3 linked determinants of behavioural outcomes with specific behaviour change techniques (BCTs) to target behaviours of interest. Step 4 involved intervention development informed by steps 1–3. Subsequently, an implementation plan was developed (Step 5) followed by an evaluation plan (Step 6).
Setting: Community and secondary care settings, North East England.
Participants: Stroke survivors and healthcare professionals (HCPs)
working in stroke services.
Results: Systematic review findings informed selection of nine ‘promising’ BCTs (e.g. problem-solving). Focus groups with stroke survivors (n = 18) and HCPs (n= 24) identified the need for an intervention delivered throughout the rehabilitation pathway, tailored to individual needs with training for HCPs delivering the intervention. Intervention delivery was considered feasible within
local stroke services. The target behaviours for the intervention were levels of physical activity and sedentary behaviour in adult stroke survivors. Assessment of acceptability and usability with 11 HCPs and 21 stroke survivors/relatives identified issues with self-monitoring tools and the need for a physical activity repository of local services’ and training for HCPs with feedback on intervention delivery. A feasibility study protocol was designed to evaluate the intervention.
Conclusions: A systematic development process using intervention mapping resulted in a multi-faceted evidence- and theory-informed intervention (Physical Activity Routines After Stroke – PARAS) for delivery by community stroke rehabilitation teams.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)439-466
Number of pages28
JournalHealth Psychology and Behavioral Medicine
Volume10
Issue number1
Early online date12 May 2022
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 12 May 2022

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