Viewing dressing evaluation through a pragmatic lens: The application of Dewey's experimentalism in the development of evidence for dressing selection

Fania Pagnamenta*, Monique Lhussier

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
8 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Rationale, Aims and Objectives: The aim of this paper is to: (1) summarise the challenges with developing evidence for dressing selection in wound care; (2) discuss the limiting influence that the Evidence Based Practice movement has had in this field; (3) discuss the opportunities offered by Dewey’s theory of experimentalism as a pragmatic solution to develop a structured body of evidence.

Findings: Whilst the number of dressings available on the market continue to proliferate, limited progress has taken place to develop a methodology for dressing evaluation that is relevant to clinical practice. It is proposed that experimentalism can be operationalised with a mixed-methods approach that may include; (a) medical histories and patient’s stories; (b) participant observation and informal interviews; (c) a comparative study between a new dressing and standard care; (d) a patient’s satisfaction survey; (e) a staff survey; (f) a cost examination and (g) an evaluation of the packaging and procurement route and finally (h) a clinical meeting to triangulate the data and reach a consensus.

Conclusion: Experimentalism offers a framework for the construction of evidence used for dressing selection. Central to this concept is the integration of experience to the data collected. The context of the evaluation has equal weight to the data thus collected.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)988-994
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice
Volume24
Issue number5
Early online date20 Jul 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2018

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