Vocalising violence: Using violent mens' voices for service delivery and feedback

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

DOI

Authors

External departments

  • Newcastle University
  • Northumbria University

Details

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationC and T 2019 - 9th International Conference on Communities and Technologies, Conference Proceedings
EditorsFlorian Cech, Hilda Tellioglu
Place of PublicationNew York
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery, Inc
Pages210-217
Number of pages8
ISBN (Electronic)9781450371629
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 3 Jun 2019
Externally publishedYes
Event9th International Conference on Communities and Technologies, C and T 2019 - Vienna, Austria
Duration: 3 Jun 20197 Jun 2019

Publication series

NameACM International Conference Proceeding Series

Conference

Conference9th International Conference on Communities and Technologies, C and T 2019
CountryAustria
CityVienna
Period3/06/197/06/19
Publication type

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Public services are being increasingly scrutinised for their ability to be responsive and adaptive to their service users' needs. For service delivery in domestic violence, many aspire to include feedback from service users on their practice, to drive change in their organisation and performance. Current approaches for capturing and using feedback (i.e. surveys) often fail to record rich, in-depth perspectives that audio-video media affords. In this paper, we present the novel application of a voice-based technology to capture and use feedback to reflect on the delivery of a domestic violence intervention. Across four months, we undertook ethnographic fieldwork through observations of four deployments and four reflective discussions with service-staff in their delivery of a novel domestic violence prevention intervention for violent men. Our findings highlight the tensions with how voice can act as a resource to reflect on and refine existing service practices, and offers insights into how technology can play a more practical role in wider service design.