What's so Special? Teachers' Models and Their Realisation in Practice in Segregated Schools

Joan Adams, John Swain, Jim Clark

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The concept of 'special' has played a crucial role in the development of educational policy and practice, and the meaning of the term has been the subject of far-reaching debates and controversy. This paper is based on research which explored the meaning of 'specialness' in theory and practice from the point of view of practitioners working in segregated schools, providing education for young people designated as having moderate and severe learning difficulties. The research demonstrates the articulation of the individual model of special in teachers' thinking about pupils, themselves and their relationships with pupils, and also in the learning environment provided for different categories of young people. We argue that the dominant discursive practices of practitioners construct and maintain 'otherness' in special education, and pre-empt alternative discourses.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)233-245
JournalDisability & Society
Volume15
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2000

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