When does anticipating group-based shame lead to lower ingroup favoritism? The role of status and status stability

Lee Shepherd, Russell Spears, Antony Manstead

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In two studies we examined whether and when anticipated group-based shame leads to less ingroup favoritism on the part of members of high-status groups in stable hierarchies. In Study 1 (n = 195) we measured anticipated group-based shame and found that it only negatively predicted ingroup favoritism in stable high-status groups. When anticipated group-based shame was low, members of such groups exhibited the highest levels of ingroup favoritism. However, these groups displayed the lowest levels of ingroup favoritism when shame was high. In Study 2 (n = 159) we manipulated anticipated group-based shame using a bogus-pipeline method. Members of stable high-status groups were less likely to discriminate against a low-status group in the high than in the low anticipated group-based shame condition. This may explain discrepancies in previous research regarding the amount of ingroup favoritism exhibited by (stable) high-status groups: Shame only leads to less discrimination when identity was secure.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)334-343
JournalJournal of Experimental Social Psychology
Volume49
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2013

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