When faecal sludge reuse doesn’t work: a look at access for the poorest and people with disabilities in urban Malawi

Adrian Mallory, Martin Crapper, Rochelle Holm

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

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Abstract

Reusing faecal sludge to generate value has the potential to contribute towards solving the issue of long term sanitation solutions in cities across Sub-Saharan Africa. This research was conducted to evaluate the potential for faecal sludge reuse in Malawi, and the difficulties and challenges to existing attempts at reuse in a city. We conducted 65 semi-structured interviews in a city of Malawi. The results show that two main approaches exist currently: The implementation of Skyloos as above ground household toilets which provide compost; and a central disposal site from which compost is illegally harvested. Both existing approaches to faecal sludge management and reuse were found to be inaccessible and not working when implemented for the poorest and people with disabilities.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages6
Publication statusPublished - 9 Jul 2018
Event41st WEDC International Conference: Transformation Towards Sustainable and Resilient Wash Services - Egerton University, Nakuru, Kenya
Duration: 9 Jul 201813 Jul 2018
https://wedc-knowledge.lboro.ac.uk/conference/41/index.html

Conference

Conference41st WEDC International Conference
Abbreviated titleWEDC 41
CountryKenya
CityNakuru
Period9/07/1813/07/18
Internet address

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