Whitby Goth Weekend (1994-present): Gothic Subcultures

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

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Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe Gothic
Subtitle of host publicationA Reader
EditorsSimon Bacon
PublisherPeter Lang
Pages105-110
Number of pages6
ISBN (Electronic)9781787072701
ISBN (Print)9781787072688
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 26 Apr 2018
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Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

Abstract

In addressing a twenty-first-century analysis of Goth music and subculture, critics and commentators have noted how the genre has developed from its origins in the late 1970s. The now well-rehearsed narrative of Goth usually identifies a number of key points in history, noting the emergence of bands like The Damned, Siouxsie and the Banshees, and Bauhaus, whilst the London nightclub called The Batcave became a focal point for much of the energy of early Goth. The popularity of The Sisters of Mercy (although the lead singer, Andrew Eldritch, rejects any association with the subculture) in many ways marked Goth’s incursion into the mainstream, whilst the reconstitution of Goth into subgenres such as Cybergoth, Gothic Metal, Industrial and even Steampunk, testifies to a broader scene emerging from the 1980s Goth tradition. Many of these subgenres can be found assembling at Whitby Goth Weekend, UK, a bi-annual event hosted in the North Yorkshire seaside town. Originally organized as a Goth meet-up event by Jo Hampshire in 1994, the festival is now one of the larger events in the European Goth calendar, rivalled only by M’era Luna in Hildesheim, Germany, and Wave Gotik Treffen in Leipzig.