Women’s self-estimates of body size are more accurate and precise when made with three-quarter view than front-view stimuli

Piers L. Cornelissen*, Lise Gulli Brokjøb, Jiří Gumančík, Katri K. Cornelissen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Recently, Cornelissen, Cornelissen, Groves, McCarty, & Tovée (2018) asked which image orientations (e.g. front-, side-, or three-quarter view) are most appropriate for tasks which are used for self-estimates of body size and shape. Based on psychophysical measurements, they showed that front view stimuli showed substantially poorer content validity compared to side- and three-quarter view stimuli. Here, we tested the real-world consequences of Cornelissen et al.’s (2018) findings. We carried out a body size self-estimation task in a sample of healthy adult women, once with front view stimuli, and once with three-quarter view stimuli. The order in which front- and three-quarter view tasks were carried out was randomized across participants. Compared to three-quarter view stimuli, we found that: a) the precision of participants’ judgements was worse with front view stimuli, and b) that front view stimuli led to over-estimation of body size by ~1.7 BMI units. While these results need to be replicated, they do suggest that careful consideration needs to be given to stimulus orientation in future studies.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)171-180
Number of pages10
JournalBody Image
Volume38
Early online date21 Apr 2021
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 21 Apr 2021

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